“The competitive advantage of having youth at the table” – Eric Mitchell, OLY

Sport has the power to affect change in communities and the International Olympic Committee has decided to tap into this opportunity with their revamped Young Leaders Programme. Through an invitation to be involved, relevant capacity building, and value creation, young athletes and aspiring administrators can not only make a difference on the ground but also make a valuable contribution in the boardroom with their fresh perspectives. In this #SportWorksTALK, we welcome Canadian Olympian and IOC Young Leader Eric Mitchell who founded Pass the Torch, a program tailored to athletes who want to be more involved in their communities by promoting the values and principles of Olympism. Mitchell talks about the evolution of the programme and shares his experience as an alumnus and now as a mentor of the next generation. It’s a look ahead to the future of sport.

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